SUNDAY MAY 22, 2016

MULTIRACIAL AMERICAN LITERATURE IN THE 21ST CENTURY
Council Chambers: 11:00am—12:30pm
John R. Keene, Victor LaValle, Emily Raboteau, Justin Desmangles

SCREENING: AGRICULTURAL LABOR AND THE WPA
Hearing Room 1: 11:00am—12:15pm
Linda Norton, Nora Sweeney, Steve Dickison

THE NEW COMPANY TOWN
Hearing Room 2: 11:00am—12:15pm
Rachel Brahinsky, Ben Grant, Dan Lyons, Kara Platoni

SLAVERY: REALITY AND PERCEPTIONS
Hearing Room 3: 11:00am—12:00pm
Matthew Delmont, Shirley Ann Wilson Moore

REFORM VS. ABOLITION: FIXING OUR BROKEN PRISON SYSTEM
Hearing Room 4: 11:00am—12:00pm
Robin Levi, Cecily McMillan, Jessica Jackson Sloan

COMING OUT LIKE A PORN STAR
Dalziel Building, 250 Frank Ogawa Plaza: 11:00am—12:15pm
Cinnamon Maxxine, Chelsea Poe, Shar Rednour, Andre Shakti, Jackie Strano, Kitty Stryker, Madison Young

CONFESSIONS OF A NUMBER ONE SON: CHINESE-AMERICAN LITERATURE NOW
Laurel Book Store: 11:00am—12:15pm
Frank Chin, Genny Lim, Calvin McMillin

THE 100 YEAR CALL OF THE WILD
Hearing Room 3: 12:15—1:30pm
Tarnel Abbott, Iris Jamahl Dunkle, Steven Lavoie, Jay Williams, Jack Boulware

GLOBAL FICTION AND AMERICAN READERS
Hearing Room 4: 12:15—1:30pm
Mauro Javier Cardenas, Brad Johnson, Caille Millner, Oscar Villalon

LINES OF WORK
Hearing Room 1: 12:30—1:30pm
Pico Iyer, Leopold Froehlich

UTOPIAN THOUGHT TODAY
Hearing Room 2: 12:30—1:45pm
Russell Jacoby, Sarah Leonard, James Miller

THE POLICING CRISIS AND BLACK LIVES MATTER
Dalziel Building, 250 Frank Ogawa Plaza: 12:30—1:45pm
Justin Hansford, Rachel Herzing, George Lipsitz, Jordan T. Camp, Christina Heatherton

WORKING WRITERS
Chamber of Commerce: 12:30—1:45pm
Lucha Corpi, Mary Mackey, Maceo Montoya, Al Young, John Curl

THE FUTURE OF THE FAMILY
Laurel Book Store: 12:30—1:45pm
Marianne Cooper, Courtney Martin, Eveline Shen

SHOCKED: THE ADVENTURES OF MARY ROACH
Council Chambers: 12:45—1:45pm
Mary Roach in conversation with Jacob Ward

THE HANDS THAT FEED: CALIFORNIA FARMWORKERS, PAST AND PRESENT
Hearing Room 1: 1:45—3:00pm
David Bacon, Lori Flores, Dawn Mabalon, Gabriel Thompson

THE POET AND THE TSAR: ART AND POWER IN RUSSIA
Hearing Room 3: 1:45—3:00pm
Anastasia Edel, Grisha Freidin, Nariman Skakov, Artur Solomonov, Annemarie O'Brien

THE FBI'S WAR ON CULTURE
Hearing Room 4: 1:45—3:00pm
William J. Maxwell, Seth Rosenfeld, Frank B. Wilderson III, Justin Desmangles

SEX WORK IS WORK
Council Chambers: 2:00—3:00pm
Elizabeth Alice Clement, Melissa Gira Grant, Ramona Naddaff

WORK, FREEDOM, VIRTUE
Hearing Room 2: 2:00—3:15pm
Matthew B. Crawford, Steven Levine, B Scot Rousse

JUSTICE FOR THE YOUNG
Dalziel Building, 250 Frank Ogawa Plaza: 2:00—3:00pm
Elaine Brown, Dashka Slater

WORKING WITH OTHERS: CONVIVIAL RESEARCH
Chamber of Commerce: 2:00—3:15pm
Manuel Callahan, Stefano Harney, Fred Moten, Linda Norton

SONGS OF WORK AND STRUGGLE
Laurel Book Store: 2:00—3:00pm
Cecil Brown, Greil Marcus, Leopold Froehlich

RACE AND THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION: MICHAEL ERIC DYSON in conversation
Council Chambers: 3:15—4:15pm
Michael Eric Dyson in conversation with Theodore Ross

CULTURE, RACE, CLASS: CLASS IDENTITIES IN THE EAST BAY
Hearing Room 1: 3:15—4:30pm
Waldo Martin Jr., Shirley Ann Wilson Moore, Fred Setterberg, Chris Rhomberg

THE LABOR OF CREATIVITY
Hearing Room 3: 3:15—4:45pm
Tim Buckwalter, Jennifer DeVere Brody, Grant Faulkner, Michael Ray, Michael Sturtz

REVOLUTION IN THE MIDDLE EAST
Hearing Room 4: 3:15—4:15pm
Laura Secor, Susanne Pari

WORKING IN SILICON VALLEY
Dalziel Building, 250 Frank Ogawa Plaza: 3:15—4:45pm
Y-Vonne Hutchinson, Dan Lyons, Brad Stone, Anastasia Edel

THE UNCANNINESS OF ALTRUISM
Hearing Room 2: 3:30—4:45pm
Mary Doyno, Gary Kamiya, Larissa MacFarquhar, Morgan Meis

DEMOCRACY IS IN THE STREETS!
Chamber of Commerce: 3:30—4:30pm
Joshua Clover, Jodi Dean, James Miller, B Scot Rousse

FOUR POETS APPROACHING DUSK
Laurel Book Store: 3:30—4:45pm
Joshua Beckman, Brynn Saito, Arisa White, Matthew Zapruder

RACE, POLITICS, AND THE OBAMA PRESIDENCY
Council Chambers: 4:45—6:00pm
Jamelle Bouie, Jelani Cobb, Isaac Chotiner

EAST BAY POETICS: LOVE & DUTY
Hearing Room 4: 4:30—6:00pm
Elmaz Abinader, Sharon Coleman, Sharon Doubiago, Claire Ortalda, Floyd Salas, Al Young, Tony R. Rodriguez

THE LEGACY OF MALCOLM X
Hearing Room 1: 4:45—6:00pm
Hisham Aidi, Michael Eric Dyson, Justin Desmangles

RETHINKING REENTRY
Hearing Room 2: 5:00—6:00pm
Abayomi Brame, Kevin McCracken, Eric Taylor

LABOR IN OAKLAND: FROM THE '46 GENERAL STRIKE TO TODAY
Hearing Room 3: 5:00—6:00pm
Fred Glass, Chris Rhomberg, Carmen Rojas, Bill Sokol

UNDERVALUED, INVISIBLE: DOMESTIC & EMOTIONAL LABOR
Dalziel Building, 250 Frank Ogawa Plaza: 5:00—6:00pm
Arlie Hochschild, Katie Quan, Ruth Rosen, Deirdre English

JOURNALISM AND DIGITAL MEDIA
Laurel Book Store: 5:00—6:00pm
Clara Jeffery, Theodore Ross, Jamil Smith

MARATHON READING
Amphitheater, Frank Ogawa Plaza: 11:00am—6:00pm

CHILDREN'S PROGRAMMING
Stage and Craft Workshops: 11:00am—5:00pm


Getting There

Clay Street Garage (1414 Clay St, Oakland) is open and available the day of the Festival for a flat fee of $5 for the day.

You can also reach City Hall by the 12th Street/City Center BART station and AC Transit lines at the 14th Street/Broadway stops.

 

Lead Image: Parade for opening of Western Pacific Railroad, Oakland, 1865. Courtesy Oakland Public Library, Oakland History Room.

MULTIRACIAL AMERICAN LITERATURE IN THE 21ST CENTURY
Presented by Before Columbus Foundation

Council Chambers: 11:00am—12:30pm

Laying hold of the crucible of slavery and genocide in which the New World was formed, 21st century American writers respond with sensuous, supple, and frequently paradoxical narratives of racial identity. On this panel, three of today’s most innovative and exciting writers bring their work and experience to bear on questions of color, literature, and the American voice.

JOHN R. KEENE joined the Dark Room Writers Collective in 1989 and is a Graduate Fellow of the Cave Canem Writers Workshops. He is the author of Annotations and Counternarratives, as well as the poetry collection Seismosis (with artist Christopher Stackhouse), and translator of Brazilian author Hilda Hilst's novel Letters from a Seducer. He teaches at Rutgers University-Newark.

VICTOR LAVALLE is author of the short story collection Slapboxing with Jesus, three novels (The Ecstatic, Big Machine, and The Devil in Silver), and two novellas, Lucretia and the Kroons and The Ballad of Black Tom. He has received a Whiting Writers' Award, a United States Artists Ford Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Shirley Jackson Award, an American Book Award, and the key to Southeast Queens.

EMILY RABOTEAU is author of the novel The Professor’s Daughter and a work of creative nonfiction, Searching for Zion, named a best book of 2013 by The Huffington Post and The San Francisco Chronicle and winner of a 2014 American Book Award. Her fiction and essays have been published and anthologized in Best American Short Stories, The New York Times, Tin House, McSweeney’s, The Guardian, Guernica, VQR, The Believer, and elsewhere. Honors include a Pushcart Prize, The Chicago Tribune’s Nelson Algren Award, and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York Foundation for the Arts, and the MacDowell Colony.

JUSTIN DESMANGLES (moderator) is Chairman of the board of directors of the Before Columbus Foundation. He is the creator of the critically acclaimed radio program, New Day Jazz, now in its 15th year. His poetry and journalism have appeared in Amerarcana, Black Renaissance Noire (NYU), Drumvoices Revue (SIUE), and Konch. His most recent publications are Passion Provocation & Prophecy, with Jack Hirschman, and Black Hollywood Unchained, edited by Ishmael Reed.


SCREENING: AGRICULTURAL LABOR AND THE WPA
Hearing Room 1: 11:00am—12:15pm

A land of orange groves, almond orchards, fertile soil, and gold-drenched mountains, California’s promise contrasts sharply with the reality that migrant workers face when they arrive here. On this panel, filmmaker Nora Sweeney will screen her short documentary Sweet Oranges, in which she meets Jaime, Blanca, and Hugo, orange pickers from Michoacan, Mexico, who share with her their songs, dreams, aspirations, and thoughts about work. Artist and writer Linda Norton will present a slideshow on the Works Progress Administration and FSA photographs of the 1930s and 40s and the shifting demographics of agricultural and immigrant labor since then. Their presentations will be followed by a discussion with the audience.

LINDA NORTON’s first book, The Public Gardens: Poems and History, was a finalist for a 2011 Los Angeles Times Book Prize. She is a recipient of a 2014 Creative Work Fund award and the William Dickey Fellowship at San Francisco State University. Her latest book, Wite-Out, is forthcoming in 2017.

NORA SWEENEY is a documentary filmmaker and photographer based in Los Angeles. Her films have been screened at REDCAT, the Chicago Underground Film Festival, the Athens International Film + Video Festival, and the Black Maria Film and Video Festival, where she won a Jury's Choice Award for Something Like Whales.

STEVE DICKISON (moderator), poet and writer, is Director of The Poetry Center at San Francisco State University. Recent work appears in Best American Experimental Writing 2015, BOMB, Hambone, Aufgabe, Mandorla, Vanitas, Amerarcana, and Where Eagles Dare. He is coeditor of the anthologies Prison/Culture and Homage to Etel Adnan


THE NEW COMPANY TOWN
Hearing Room 2: 11:00am—12:15pm

The Levittown model is alive and well in Silicon Valley, as technology companies peddle a physical and psychological melding of home and work embodied in onsite gyms, haircuts, meals, entertainment, and most recently, on-campus apartments for their work forces. This panel will examine the troubling legacy of the new company town and its effect on workers.

RACHEL BRAHINSKY serves as Faculty Director of the Graduate Programs in Urban Affairs and Public Affairs at the University of San Francisco. Her research and teaching center around the challenges of race and inequality in the context of rapidly changing American cities.

BENJAMIN GRANT is a city planner, urban designer, curator, and lecturer. An East Bay native and Oakland resident, he currently heads SPUR's interagency Master Plan for Ocean Beach.

DAN LYONS is The New York Times bestselling author of Disrupted: My Misadventure in the Start-up Bubble. A veteran technology journalist, he was a senior editor at Forbes, a writer at Newsweek and a member of the writing staff on HBO's Silicon Valley.

KARA PLATONI (moderator) is a journalist based in the Bay Area who focuses on science. Her latest book, We Have the Technology, is a collection of eleven stories about exploring and hacking sensory perception.


SLAVERY: REALITY AND PERCEPTIONS
Hearing Room 3: 11:00am—12:00pm

Fictionalized dramatizations of slavery in film and television, most notably the miniseries Roots, sway our perceptions of one of America’s founding institutions and most shameful eras. How do the representations of slavery differ from the lived reality? Two historians discuss the making of Roots and the lives and accounts of African Americans in the 1840s-60s.

A professor of history at Arizona State University, MATTHEW DELMONT is the author of Making Roots, Why Busing Failed, and The Nicest Kids in Town, all published by University of California Press.

SHIRLEY ANN WILSON MOORE, Professor Emerita of History at California State University, Sacramento, is the author most recently of Sweet Freedom’s Plains: African Americans on the Overland Trails, 1841–1869, and coeditor with Quintard Taylor of African American Women Confront the West, 1600–2000.


REFORM VS. ABOLITION: FIXING OUR BROKEN PRISON SYSTEM
Hearing Room 4: 11:00am—12:00pm

The criminal justice system in America is broken. Can it be fixed? The prison abolition movement advocates for a society that does not rely on prisons, while prison reformers strive to improve the current system via a smart and safe reduction of the prison population. This panel will present and examine the arguments for both reform and abolition of the prison system in the United States.

ROBIN LEVI has been a women’s human rights advocate for more than twenty years. She is also College Outreach Coordinator at Students Rising Above, which helps low-income, high-achieving youth apply to and then successfully graduate from college.

CECILY MCMILLAN is a social justice organizer and prison rights advocate whose participation in, and arrest during, the Occupy Wall Street movement, along with her trial and conviction have been widely covered by the national media. Her memoir The Emancipation of Cecily McMillan is forthcoming from Nation Books.

A human rights attorney, JESSICA JACKSON SLOAN is the national director and cofounder of #cut50, a prison reform advocacy organization. Her first marriage was destroyed by the incarceration industry when her then-husband was sentenced to prison.


COMING OUT LIKE A PORN STAR
Dalziel Building, 250 Frank Ogawa Plaza: 11:00am—12:15pm

Experts, authors, performers, and activists discuss the book Coming Out Like a Porn Star, which shares intimate personal stories of porn performers "coming out" to family, friends, partners, lovers, and community.

CINNAMON MAXXINE is a queer porno personality, stripper, and San Francisco Bay Area original diva. Maxxine is on a mission to confront racism, race bias, fat phobia, and the generic femme bias in sex work and porn.

CHELSEA POE is a writer, director, porn performer, and trans activist. Her first full-length feature Fucking Mystic premiered at the Berlin Porn Film Festival. Poe is an outspoken advocate for better representation of trans women within pornography.

SHAR REDNOUR and JACKIE STRANO founded S.I.R. Productions that created the movies Bend Over Boyfriend (with coproducer Fatale Media), Hard Love & How to Fuck in High Heels and Healing Sex: A Mind-Body Approach to Healing Sexual Trauma with Staci Haines. They are featured in Ken Swartz’s historical documentary San Francisco: Sex and The City.

ANDRE SHAKTI is a queer polyamorous educator, producer, activist, and professional slut living in the San Francisco Bay Area. She is committed to normalizing alternative desires, destigmatizing sex workers and their clients, and not taking herself too seriously.

KITTY STRYKER is the production assistant at TROUBLEfilms. She is interested in the intersections between explicit materials, politics, and ethics. Stryker has written for The Guardian, The Daily Dot, and The Frisky.

MADISON YOUNG is an author, artist, feminist pornographer, certified sex educator, and mother. She is the author of Subversive MotherhoodDaddy: A Memoir and her forthcoming DIY Porn Handbook: Documenting Our Own Sexual Revolution. She is currently working on her third book, The Ultimate Guide to Sex During Pregnancy and Motherhood.


CONFESSIONS OF A NUMBER ONE SON: CHINESE-AMERICAN LITERATURE NOW
Presented by Before Columbus Foundation

Laurel Book Store: 11:00am—12:15pm

The Chinese presence in North America predates the formation of the United States by several centuries, thus making Chinese-American Literature one of the most complex traditions in contemporary letters. The arc and panorama of this vibrant, urgent stream among American artistic tributaries will be discussed with one of its master practitioners and grand iconoclasts, Frank Chin. The Confessions of a Number One Son: The Great Chinese American Novel, Mr. Chin's most recent novel, will serve as the axis of this conversation, which will include its editor, Prof. Calvin McMillin, and Genny Lim, a key presence in contemporary Chinese-American culture.

FRANK CHIN is an award-winning playwright, novelist, and cultural critic. His first two plays, The Chickencoop Chinaman and The Year of the Dragon, remain seminal works in the history of Asian American theater. Chin’s books include Donald DukGunga Din Highway, and Bulletproof Buddhists. He is also the coeditor of two landmark anthologies of Asian American literature: Aiiieeeee! and its sequel, The Big Aiiieeeee!

GENNY LIM's poetry books are Winter Place from the San Francisco Kearny Street Workshop and Child of War. She is author of two plays: Paper Angels and Bitter Cane and the nonfiction book Island: Poetry and History of Chinese Immigrants on Angel Island. Lim has performed and recorded in poetry and music collaborations with jazz greats Max Roach, Herbie Lewis, John Santos, Francis Wong, and Jon Jang. Paper Angels was performed in San Francisco's Chinatown and won the Fringe Festival Top Ten Award for Best Site Specific Work. Her performance piece, Where is Tibet? premiered at CounterPulse, and was performed at AfroSolo Arts and Women on the Way Festivals.

CALVIN MCMILLIN is a writer, teacher, and scholar. Born in Singapore and raised in rural Oklahoma, he received his PhD in literature from the University of California, Santa Cruz. He writes fiction and previously worked as a film critic for LoveHKFilm.com, a Hong Kong cinema Web site.


THE 100 YEAR CALL OF THE WILD
Presented by Litquake
Hearing Room 3: 12:15—1:30pm

Jack London died 100 years ago. To commemorate the anniversary of this Oakland native, four experts will explore London’s literary legacy and what it teaches us about literature, art, and the issues we face today. 

TARNEL ABBOTT is the great grand daughter of Jack London, a political activist, and a retired librarian. She created a performance based on Jack London's dystopian novel The Iron Heel.

IRIS JAMAHL DUNKLE is the Poet Laureate of Sonoma County. Her latest poetry book is There’s a Ghost in this Machine of Air. She is currently cowriting a new biography on Jack London's wife, Charmian Kittredge London. 

STEVEN LAVOIE is a poet and librarian who has spent his life in the shadow of Jack London. He is the author or Historic Photos of Oakland and currently manages the Oakland Temescal Branch Library.

JAY WILLIAMS is the senior managing editor of Critical Inquiry, a humanities journal published by the University of Chicago Press. He was the founding publisher and editor of the Jack London Journal. He is the author of The Author Under Sail: The Imagination of Jack London.

JACK BOULWARE (moderator) is the cofounder of Litquake, and author or coauthor of three books including San Francisco Bizarro, and the Bay Area punk history Gimme Something Better


GLOBAL FICTION AND AMERICAN READERS
Presented by ZYZZYVA
Hearing Room 4: 12:15—1:30pm

Are we seeing a resurgence among US readers for global fiction? And if so, what's behind the popularity and attraction of the work of such authors as Elena Ferrante, Valeria Luiselli, Karl Ove Knausgaard, Cesar Aira, Fiston Mwanza Mujila?

MAURO JAVIER CARDENAS’s essays and interviews have appeared in BOMB, the San Francisco Chronicle, and The Quarterly Conversation. His first novel, The Revolutionaries Try Again, will be published by Coffee House Press in Fall 2016.

BRAD JOHNSON is an independent scholar specializing in aesthetics and religion, essayist-reviewer, and manager at Diesel Bookstore in Oakland.

CAILLE MILLNER is an editorial writer and columnist at the San Francisco Chronicle. She is the author of the memoir The Golden Road: Notes on My Gentrification. Her story "The Politics of the Quotidian" (ZYZZYVA No. 104) will appear in Best American Short Stories 2016.

OSCAR VILLALON (moderator) is the managing editor of ZYZZYVA and former San Francisco Chronicle books editor.


LINES OF WORK
Presented by Lapham's Quarterly
Hearing Room 1: 12:30
—1:30pm

Acclaimed travel writer Pico Iyer will discuss work from a historical and global perspective, using the writings, art, and artifacts found in the pages of Lapham’s Quarterly.

PICO IYER’s books include The Art of Stillness: Adventures in Going NowhereVideo Night in KathmanduThe Lady and the MonkCuba and the NightFalling off the MapTropical Classical, and The Global Soul. He writes for The New York TimesThe New York Review of Books, Harper’sTime, and countless other magazines and newspapers around the world.

LEOPOLD FROEHLICH is a senior editor at Lapham's Quarterly. Previously, he served as managing editor for Playboy magazine.

UTOPIAN THOUGHT TODAY
Hearing Room 2: 12:30—1:45pm

In the nineteenth century and as recently as the 1960s, many activists and thinkers on the left seriously entertained the prospect of a "post-scarcity" society—a world in which labor would cease to be alienated. Those dreams seem distant today. What happened? Were these utopian hopes illusory? And what are the prospects for a revival of utopian thought today?

RUSSELL JACOBY is Professor in Residence at UCLA’s Department of History. He is the author of various articles and books, including Social Amnesia, The Last Intellectuals, The End of Utopia, and Picture Imperfect: Utopian Thought for an Anti-Utopian Age.

SARAH LEONARD is a senior editor at The Nation and coeditor of The Future We Want: Radical Ideas for the New Century. She is also an editor-at-large at Dissent and a contributing editor to The New Inquiry.

JAMES MILLER teaches politics at the New School in New York. A recovering rock critic, he is the author of works on various topics, including Marxism and existentialism; Rousseau and the rise of modern democracy; the American New Left of the Sixties; the life and times of Michel Foucault; the curse of bullshit among tenured radicals; and, most recently, Examined Lives: From Socrates to Nietzsche.


THE POLICING CRISIS AND BLACK LIVES MATTER
Presented by Verso Books
Dalziel Building, 250 Frank Ogawa Plaza: 12:30—1:45pm

Join the editors and authors of Policing the Planet: Why the Policing Crisis Led to Black Lives Matter. Combining firsthand accounts from activists with the research of scholars and reflections from artists, Policing the Planet traces the global spread of the broken-windows policing strategy, first established in New York City. It’s a doctrine that has vastly broadened police power the world over—to deadly effect.

JUSTIN HANSFORD is an activist, lawyer, professor, and Fullbright scholar. After his arrest during a protest in Ferguson, he accompanied the Mike Brown family to the United Nations, and he has continued to work as an advocate in support of the movement both locally and globally.

RACHEL HERZING lives in Oakland, where she fights the violence of policing and imprisonment. She is a cofounder of Critical Resistance, codirector of the StoryTelling and Organizing Project, and a 2015-2016 Soros Justice Fellow.

GEORGE LIPSITZ, Chair of the Board of Directors of the African American Policy Forum, is a professor of Black studies and sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of many books, including How Racism Takes Place.

JORDAN T. CAMP (moderator) is a postdoctoral fellow in Race and Ethnicity and International and Public Affairs at Brown, coeditor of Policing the Planet, and author of Incarcerating the Crisis: Freedom Struggles and the Rise of the Neoliberal State.

CHRISTINA HEATHERTON (moderator) is Assistant Professor of American Studies at Trinity College, coeditor of Policing the Planet, and author of the forthcoming book, The Color Line and the Class Struggle: The Mexican Revolution, Internationalism, and the American Century.


WORKING WRITERS
Presented by PEN Oakland
Chamber of Commerce: 12:30
—1:45pm

Underpaid and undervalued has long been the financial destiny of creative writers. Could it be any different? Is new publishing technology changing the relationship between money and the literary arts? How should writers be paid for their work? Four writers discuss the issues of money and writing.

LUCHA CORPI is an award-winning author of two poetry collections in Spanish, two bilingual children's books, and six novels in English. Her poetry has been translated into German, French, and Italian. Her collection of essays, Confessions of a Book Burner, was published in 2014.

New York Times bestselling writer MARY MACKEY has published 14 novels and 7 collections of poetry, including Sugar Zone, winner of the 2012 PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Award. She is Professor Emeritus of English at California State University Sacramento.

MACEO MONTOYA’s paintings, drawings, and prints have been featured in exhibitions and publications throughout the country and internationally. He has published three works of fiction, including You Must Fight Them (2015) and Letters to the Poet from His Brother (2014).

AL YOUNG’s books include poetry, fiction, essays, anthologies, and musical memoirs. He served as California’s poet laureate. Honors include NEA, Fulbright, and Guggenheim Fellowships and the 2011 Thomas Wolfe Award. He is Distinguished Professor at California College of the Arts’ MFA in Writing Program.

JOHN CURL (moderator) is the author of novels, poetry, history, memoir, and translations, including Ancient American Poets. Chair of PEN Oakland, he represented the USA at World Poetry Festival 2010 in Venezuela. Jack Hirschman called him "one of the most important revolutionary poets since WW2."

THE FUTURE OF THE FAMILY
Laurel Book Store: 12:30—1:45pm

With the majority of US households headed by single parents or two working parents, how will our policies and culture regarding families change?

MARIANNE COOPER, PhD is a sociologist at the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University. She is the author of Cut Adrift: Families in Insecure Time and was the lead researcher for Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg.

COURTNEY E. MARTIN is the author of The New Better Off: Reinventing the American Dream (launching in September) and the cofounder of the Solutions Journalism Network.  

EVELINE SHEN is Executive Director of Forward Together. She also serves on the board of the Movement Strategy Center. Women's eNews named her one of their 21 Leaders for the 21st Century.


SHOCKED: THE ADVENTURES OF MARY ROACH
Council Chambers: 12:45—1:45pm

In her forthcoming book, Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War, Mary Roach writes about the science of survival and strategy in the most dangerous jobs on earth. In this conversation with television correspondent Jacob Ward, she'll explain how science is trying to make soldiers immune to panic, exhaustion, and trauma.

MARY ROACH is the author of the forthcoming Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War. She has explored life, death, sex, food, and everything in between in books such as BonkStiffSpook, and Packing for Mars. Her writing has appeared in OutsideWiredNational Geographic, and The New York Times Magazine, among others. She lives in Oakland, California.

The former science and technology correspondent for Al Jazeera America and editor-in-chief of Popular Science magazine, JACOB WARD has presented television programs for PBS, Discovery, and National Geographic, in addition to writing for The New YorkerWired, and other publications. He’s at work on a book and accompanying television series about human limits. He and his family live in Oakland.


The Hands that Feed: California Farmworkers, Past and Present
Presented by UC Press
Hearing Room 1: 1:45—3:00pm

More than 75 years ago, The Grapes of Wrath sparked a national discussion about the grinding poverty faced by California’s migrant farmworkers. Later came the successful boycotts and strikes of the 1960s and 70s. But today, workers in the fields continue to earn low wages and face dangers from pesticides to heat stroke. How did we get here? How might conditions be improved?

Award-winning journalist and photographer DAVID BACON (The Right to Stay Home) has documented the lives of farmworkers since 1988. A former factory worker and union organizer, his work has appeared in The New York TimesSan Francisco Chronicle, and The Nation.

LORI FLORES (Grounds for Dreaming) teaches on the histories of Latinos in the United States, labor and immigration, the American working class, the US West, and the US-Mexico borderlands at SUNY Stony Brook.

DAWN MABALON (Little Manila Is in the Heart) is an associate professor of history at San Francisco State University whose research and teaching focuses on race and ethnicity, California and the West, and Philippine and Filipina/o American history.

GABRIEL THOMPSON (moderator) is an independent journalist who has written for SlateMother JonesHarper’s, and The Nation. His most recent book is America’s Social Arsonist: Fred Ross and Grassroots Organizing in the Twentieth Century.


THE POET AND THE TSAR: ART AND POWER IN RUSSIA
Hearing Room 3: 1:45—3:00pm

When a nation lacks democratic institutions, art becomes a primary channel for political imagination. Through the act of writing, acting or filming, the artist assumes the responsibility for expressing thoughts of the whole society—and for challenging the established order. On this panel, Russian and American writers and scholars discuss the complicated relationship between art and power in Russia.  

ANASTASIA EDEL is the author of Russia: Putin’s Playground (2016). Her essays and fiction have appeared in World Literature Today and Cream City Review

GRISHA FREIDIN is Professor Emeritus of Slavic Languages and Literature at Stanford University. He is author of Coat of Many Colors and A Jew on Horseback: Isaac Babel and His Worlds (forthcoming).

NARIMAN SKAKOV is Assistant Professor of Slavic Languages and Literature at Stanford University. He is the author of The Cinema of Tarkovsky: Labyrinths of Space and Time.

ARTUR SOLOMONOV is the OZON.ru bestselling author of A Theatrical Story, a novel that reacts to the most painful and problematic facets of the modern Russian reality. He lives in Moscow.

ANNEMARIE O’BRIEN (moderator) is the author of Lara’s Gift, a novel inspired by her work as government advisor in the former countries of the Soviet Union.


THE FBI'S WAR ON CULTURE
Presented by Before Columbus Foundation

Hearing Room 4: 1:45—3:00pm

Is the production of art and culture ever a threat to national security? For the leadership of the FBI, the answer over much of the last century has been a resounding “yes!” As a result, the US government has waged a devastating 100-year war against free thought and expression, particularly among African-Americans. The use of surveillance to gain and maintain power, as salient an issue as ever in contemporary America, will be discussed by some of the leading scholars in this field.

WILLIAM J. MAXWELL teaches courses in twentieth-century American and African American literatures at Washington University. His scholarly research addresses the ties among African American writing, political history, and transatlantic culture. Maxwell’s third book, F.B. Eyes: How J. Edgar Hoover's Ghostreaders Framed African American Literature, draws on nearly 14,000 pages of newly released FBI files to expose the Bureau’s intimate policing practices of African American literature over five decades, starting in 1919. While the official aim behind the Bureau’s reading project was to anticipate political unrest, FBI surveillance ironically came to influence the creation and public reception of African American literature over the course of the twentieth century.      

SETH ROSENFELD is a freelance journalist based in San Francisco and author of the best-selling books Subversives: The FBI's War on Student Radicals, and Reagan's Rise to PowerSubversives traces the FBI's secret involvement with three iconic figures at Berkeley during the 1960s: the ambitious neophyte politician Ronald Reagan, the fierce but fragile radical Mario Savio, and the liberal University of California president Clark Kerr.

FRANK B. WILDERSON III is a writer, poet, and critical theorist. He has been a dramaturge for Lincoln Center Theater and the Market Theater (Johannesburg). He is the recipient of The National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, The Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship for Experienced Researchers, and The American Book Award. His books include Incognegro: A Memoir of Exile and Apartheid, and Red, White, & Black: Cinema and the Structure of U.S. Antagonisms. He is a professor at UC Irvine in the Departments of African American Studies and Drama and the Culture and Theory Program.

JUSTIN DESMANGLES (moderator) is Chairman of the board of directors of the Before Columbus Foundation. He is the creator of the critically acclaimed radio program, New Day Jazz, now in its 15th year. His poetry and journalism have appeared in AmerarcanaBlack Renaissance Noire (NYU), Drumvoices Revue (SIUE), and Konch. His most recent publications are Passion Provocation & Prophecy, with Jack Hirschman, and Black Hollywood Unchained, edited by Ishmael Reed.


SEX WORK IS WORK
Council Chambers: 2:00—3:00pm

Sex work continues to simultaneously titillate and scandalize the ever seducible bourgeoisie. But behind the peephole sensationalism and the hand-wringing is a ruthless economy and an army of workers to whom both progressives and conservatives persistently condescend. This panel will address the politics and criminalization of sex work, and the deeper socioeconomic prejudices and misconceptions that deny such labor dignity.

ELIZABETH ALICE CLEMENT is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Utah, and a prominent scholar of prostitution and the ways it broadens our understanding of race, gender, and class.

MELISSA GIRA GRANT is a writer covering sex, tech, and politics. Her latest book, Playing the Whore: The Work of Sex Work, challenges the myths about selling sex and those who perpetuate them. She is a columnist at Pacific Standard, and her reporting has appeared in The NationWiredThe GuardianSlateBuzzfeed, and VICE.

RAMONA NADDAFF (moderator) is Associate Professor of Rhetoric at UC Berkeley and an editor of Zone Books. Author of Exiling the Poets: The Production of Poetry in Plato's Republic, she writes on philosophy and literature, and literary censorship. 


WORK, FREEDOM, VIRTUE
Hearing Room 2: 2:00—3:15pm

How does the work you do (and the tools you use) shape the person you become? Is it possible that some types of work cultivate ethical virtue and individual freedom, while others result in moral diminishment and wage enslavement? And why do so many of us eschew working with our hands and the mastery of real things for a life in the cubicle and a dependence on consumer goods? This panel is an inquiry into the value of work and its relationship to living a meaningful, useful, and good life.

MATTHEW B. CRAWFORD is the award-winning author of The World Beyond Your Head: On Becoming an Individual in an Age of Distraction and Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry Into the Value of Work. He majored in physics at UC Santa Barbara and later earned a PhD in political philosophy from the University of Chicago, specializing in ancient political thought. Currently he is a senior fellow at the University of Virginia’s Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture and fabricates parts for custom motorcycles in Richmond, Virginia.

STEVEN LEVINE is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. His scholarly work has appeared in the European Journal of Philosophy, the Canadian Journal of Philosophy, and Philosophical Topics. He also writes for non-academic forums on such topics as US foreign policy, Occidentalism, nationalism, and the moral permissibility of drones. He is currently writing a book entitled Pragmatism, Objectivity, and Experience.

B SCOT ROUSSE (moderator) is a writer and philosopher working in the tradition of existential phenomenology and currently engrossed with the fate of education in a technological age. He holds a PhD in philosophy from Northwestern University and plays drums in several hardcore-punk bands in the Bay Area.


JUSTICE FOR THE YOUNG
Dalziel Building, 250 Frank Ogawa Plaza
: 2:00—3:00pm

“Superpredators.” “Thugs.” Such racially coded language, used by politicians and the media alike to describe young black men, has enabled the passage of sweeping, tough-on-crime legislation that disproportionately targets communities of color. Using as a touchstone Elaine Brown’s 2003 book The Condemnation of Little B, about the life-sentence conviction of a thirteen-year-old African-American boy, this panel will address the tragic consequences of the lock-them-up-and-throw-away-the-key mentality—and the possibility of serving young people with justice.

ELAINE BROWN is an author and former leader of the Black Panther Party. Her memoir, A Taste of Power, was optioned by HBO for its miniseries The Black Panthers.

DASHKA SLATER has received a creative writing fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. Her articles have appeared in NewsweekSalonThe New York Times Magazine, and Mother Jones. She has published four children’s book and one book for adults.


WORKING WITH OTHERS: CONVIVIAL RESEARCH
Chamber of Commerce: 2:00—3:15pm

In this time of political, environmental, and economic crisis, how do we move beyond tired notions of “reform” and “security” toward “regeneration” and “safety?” How do we co-construct new models of insurgent learning and civic responsibility? How does a society based on consumption reweave the social fabric? “Conviviality" posits ways of working together as citizens, reclaiming the commons not as a resource to be exploited but as a relationship to be fostered.

MANUEL CALLAHAN is an insurgent learner and convivial researcher with the Center for Convivial Research and Autonomy. He also participates in the Universidad de la Tierra Califas when he is not working for the Mexican American Studies Department at San Jose State University.

STEFANO HARNEY teaches at Singapore Management University. He is author with Fred Moten of The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study (with Fred Moten). He is co-artistic director of the 2016 Bergen Assembly triennial in Norway.

FRED MOTEN is the author of In the Break: The Aesthetics of the Black Radical Tradition, Hughson’s Tavern, B Jenkins, The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study (with Stefano Harney), The Feel Trio, The Little Edges, and The Service Porch. He lives in Los Angeles and teaches at the University of California, Riverside.

LINDA NORTON (moderator) is the author of THE PUBLIC GARDENS: POEMS AND HISTORY. She is Senior Editor at the Oral History Center of the Bancroft Library, UC Berkeley, and lives in Oakland.