I WISH TO SAY

Mezzanine
11:00am–4:00pm

"I Wish to Say" grew out of artist Sheryl Oring's concern that not enough voices were being heard about the state-of-affairs in this country and her belief in the value of free expression that is guaranteed under our Constitution. For this project, Oring sets up a portable public office—complete with a manual typewriter—and invites people to dictate postcards to the President. This ongoing project began in 2004 with a commission from The First Amendment Project in Oakland, CA, and has had two national tours thanks to grant support from the Creative Capital Foundation. To date, more than 3,200 postcards have been sent to the White House as part of this project. Sheryl Oring and the Oakland Book Festival encourage you to send one to President Trump today.

THE JUMPSUIT PROJECT

City Hall
11:00am–6:00pm

The Jumpsuit Project is a socially engaged art project inspired by SHERRILL ROLAND’s personal experience in the prison system. Roland was wrongfully convicted of a crime and spent nearly a year in state prison before the conviction was thrown out. A year-and-a-half after being released, he was exonerated of all charges. As a response, Roland began The Jumpsuit Project: he wears an orange jumpsuit, similar to the one he wore while in prison, in public places in order to spark conversation about incarceration and its impact on individuals, families and communities. The public is invited to ask him questions, share their stories and experiences with the criminal justice system, and start to combat the stigma surrounding incarceration.

TRUMP AND THE WORKING CLASS

Council Chambers
11:00am–12:15pm
Arlie Hochschild in conversation with Clara Jeffery

Arlie Hochschild spent five years in “Red” America, during which she discovered powerful forces—fear of cultural eclipse, economic decline, perceived government betrayal—that help to explain the emotional appeal of a candidate like Donald Trump. Hochschild discusses these issue with Clara Jeffery, editor of Mother Jones, who published her research as “I Spent 5 Years with Some of Trump's Biggest Fans: How Donald Trump took a narrative of unfairness and twisted it to his advantage.”

RACE, ETHNICITY, AND THE NEW AMERICAN LITERATURE

Hearing Room 2
11:00am–12:15pm
Presented By: Before Columbus Foundation

Throughout much of our nation's early history, literacy among the non-white population was crime punishable by death. The struggle towards education and self-determination for Americans of color remains fraught with adversity. At the center of these enveloping controversies and culture wars remains the question of just what is American literature.

THE REVOLUTION WILL BE ACCESSIBLE

Hearing Room 3
11:00am–12:15pm

In 2015, chronically-ill writer Johanna Hedva famously asked, “How do I throw a brick through a bank if I can’t get out of bed?” Her inquiry ties into an ongoing dialogue about an aspect of inclusivity often overlooked by activist movements. How can we rethink our models of resistance to include and value the efforts of those with chronic illness and disabilities?

THE FUTURE OF THE ECONOMY

Hearing Room 4
11:00am–12:15pm

Technological advances used to lead to new jobs, higher wages, and improved standards of living. Today, however, globalization and accelerated automation are killing American jobs and making its workers redundant, while new wealth is moving to the already wealthy. What is to be done?

GENTRIFICATION AND THE OAKLAND HOUSING CRISIS

DALZIEL BUILDING
11:00am–12:15pm

Currently the Bay Area is embroiled in a housing crisis, one that pits the middle class against the working poor and leaves many long-term residents who liked their communities tired and heartbroken.  The debates about housing echo earlier social movements as communities feel silenced or erased and seek new ways to make the statement “I exist.” What would a just and healthy housing solution look like? What role do cities have in producing long term housing solutions, and who or what else is needed to make these solutions a reality?

STATE OF CONFUSION

Laurel Book Store
11:00am–12:15pm
Presented By: ZYZZYVA

We don't know what to believe, or who. We don't understand the White House’s motivations or those of the federal government. Paranoia rises while optimism is ground down. What can citizens, readers, writers, and critics do to stem the tide of obfuscation and fear? How can we preserve truth and clarity in a fact-free world?

FREE PRESS AND FAKE NEWS

Hearing Room 1
12:30pm–1:45pm

“Burke said there were Three Estates in Parliament; but, in the Reporters’ Gallery yonder, there sat a Fourth Estate more important far than they all.” 175 years after Thomas Carlyle praised the role of the press, a scourge of “fake news” threatens the Fourth Estate. What is fake news? How do different people define it, and where does it come from? Why did it become such a phenomenon in the past year? Finally, does it pose a mortal threat to our democracy—and if so, what can we do about it? Five journalists discuss these crucial questions.

TWENTY YEARS OF STORYTELLING

Hearing Room 3
12:30pm–1:45pm
Presented By: Zoetrope: All-Story

Celebrate twenty years of unparalleled art and fiction with Francis Ford Coppola's Zoetrope: All-Story, winner of the 2016 National Magazine Award as the finest literary magazine in the nation. Founded in 1997 to reinvigorate the American storytelling tradition, All-Story invites a different leading artist to act as guest designer for each edition, resulting in a perpetually evolving aesthetic and format. Join All-Story for a discussion about the magazine's mission, editorial process, and unique capacity for instigating interplay between art forms.

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ RIGHTS TODAY

Hearing Room 4
12:30pm–1:45pm
Presented By: Heyday Books

America’s indigenous peoples have for five centuries fought those who would steal their land, poison their water, and deny them their rights. Their struggle continues today at Standing Rock. This panel will explore the history and dynamics that led to the Oceti Sakowin Camp and what the future may hold for the Tribe and assembled Nations.

LEADERSHIP AND THE LITERARY COMMUNITY

Dalziel Building
12:30pm–1:45pm
Presented By: The Rumpus

Does diversity in leadership translate into diversity in literary content? If not, what additional changes are necessary to create a genuinely inclusive literary landscape? How does the current conservative political administration affect the literary community and what can we do to move forward?

ON EQUALITY: A CONVERSATION

Council Chambers
2:00pm–3:15pm

DANIELLE ALLEN in conversation with MARK GREIF

Education. Healthcare. Justice. Water. Leisure. Food. Art. The list of shared goods to which equal access is becoming ever more difficult goes on, and it is lengthening daily. American democracy and culture are being shaped by the pressures of inequality, while the republic and its people are groaning for relief. "All men are created equal." So we have been told. But what is equality, and what would a nation of individuals that understood equality (alongside freedom) as one of their greatest assets and rights actually look like?

RACE AND PLACE IN THE BAY AREA

Hearing Room 1
2:00pm–3:15pm
Presented By: California Humanities

The East Bay is home to civic pride, grassroots activism, and ongoing racial tensions. At a time of local and national unrest, how can the humanities contribute to the discussion of race and address societal divisions that result from historical inequalities? A panel of art, policy, and film makers will provide the local context of issues of race and place, using two documentary films funded by California Humanities as a focal point.

SUBLIME ECONOMIES: ART, MONEY, MARKETS

Hearing Room 2
2:00pm–3:15pm

This panel will investigate the history of the aesthetic sublime as it’s come down to us from Longinus, Burke, Kant, and Rudolf Otto, and why modernity, with its view that there are no objective values, has such a hard time giving the sublime a hearing. How does the sublime manifest in the art world today? And what role does the market play in transforming institutions and consciousness of visual art globally?